LISA VINEBAUM
New Demands? Solo exhibition, Spudnik Press CoorperativeNew Demands? Solo exhibition, Spudnik Press CoorperativeNew Demands? We Should Make the Laws
New Demands? People First Profits LastNew Demands? When We Strike We Win!New Demands? The Union Label is in FashionNew Demands? In Union We Are StrongNew Demands? Living Wages For All WagesNew Demands? We Mourn Our LossesNew Demands?New Demands?New Demands?New Demands?New Demands?New Demands?New Demands?New Demands?New Demands?New Demands?New Demands?New Demands?New Demands? New Demands? New Demands? New Demands?New Demands? New Demands? Stitch A Star For JusticeStitch A Star for JusticeStitch A Star for JusticeStitch A Star for JusticeCARPA flag CARPA Flag (Joshua Tree)Stop the attacks...where are all the radical jews?where are all the radical jews?not a self-hating jewnot a self-hating jewnot a self-hating jewnot a self-hating jewRadical Jewish EmplacementRadical Jewish EmplacementRadical Jewish EmplacementPlaying Schindler's ListSchindler SimulacraSchindler SimulacraSchindler SimulacraSchindler Simulacraalbum, a postmemory installationalbum, a postmemory installationalbum, a postmemory installationalbum, a postmemory installationon my way to whereon my way to where
ART WORK
My art practice spans multiple media and forms, and incorporates lens-based and public performances, sited interventions, socially engaged interactions, participatory sewing projects, screen and digital printing, text-based installations, neon signs, and textile banners. My work responds to and seeks to create dialogue about pressing current issues, notably, working conditions and the curtailment of workers' rights, economic globalization, precarity, and the value of artistic labor. I have also grappled with the Israeli occupation of Palestine, and with the difficulties of speaking out as a progressive Jew against Israeli-state aggression against Palestinians. History, politics, and social relationships often constitute the raw material of my practice, which also draws on archival research, and personal family history. My interest in labor histories connects to cultural histories of Jewish activism in the garment industry, as well as my own family history: both of my parents and three of my grandparents worked in the garment industry in some capacity or another, and my grandmother was a factory worker and seamstress for most of her life.

Since 2011 I have been creating work under the title of New Demands?, an ongoing series of exhibitions and performances connecting the current crisis in timed labor to historical struggles for workers’ rights, particularly in the garment and textile industries. Many of the rights that were fought for and won by workers during the first half of the 20th century — the right to collective bargaining and freedom of association, workplace safety standards, a regulated work day and week, overtime and vacation pay, and health benefits — have been dramatically eroded in recent years, the result of increasingly neoliberal and predatory economic policies. As a result, demands for improved working conditions from 100 years ago remain relevant today. New Demands? mobilizes the slogans and demands of the American labor movement, and the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union in particular. Using print and neon works, installations and performances, these historical slogans and demands are reinserted into public spaces, calling attention to the ongoing need for better working conditions, and creating spaces for interaction and dialogue.